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Monday, August 3, 2020

Passing Input Parameters into Power Query

In Power Query, you can set up a worksheet to take user input, perform calculations or other forms of data manipulation (or transformation) and output a specific table based on the user input. This would be an example of passing an input parameter to Power Query. Even though you could perform this with some combination of functions, pivot tables or slicers, the nice thing about Power Query is that the underlying steps can all be "hidden" from your user and you can just enable a one click does all for your user. This simple example in the video will show you how to pass a user parameter from Excel into Power Query.

Monday, July 27, 2020

Group and Merge Data for Calculations in Power Query

This video show how to use the group by and merge capabilities in Power Query with in an example use case. This was an actual use case where management was trying to track the completion rate for workers for courses they needed to take over multiple quarters as part of an employee development initiative. This involved figuring out what courses employees took, the completion counts per manager and the completion rate of the managers respective of their total employee population. This could usually be done with copying and pasting data table, performing lookups, calculation totals and finally formatting it in one table for upper management consumption. Doing all those task takes time so if this could be done in ONE click, it would save time. So Power Query can do this and very effectively. See the video to learn how.

Monday, July 20, 2020

Use the FREQUENCY Function

A common activity in analyzing a bunch of data is to categorize it. One way to do that is to put it into bins or buckets of ranges. For example if you have a list of ages you may want to put the count of people is the age range of decades like 0 to 10 and then 11 to 20 and etcetera. You can use the FREQUENCY function to do this simple categorization. See the video to learn how.